Questions About the New Job and the Company

Questions you will be asked during and interview, along with recommended answers, illegal interview questions, and more. Job interviews are always nerve-racking - even for job seekers who have been on countless interviews. The best form to attenuate the stress is to be prepared. Take the time to review the "standard" interview questions you will most likely be asked. Also review sample answers to these typical interview questions. Then take the time to investigate about the company. That way you will be ready with learned answers for the job interview questions that specifically relate to the company you are interviewing with.
  1. What interests you about this job?

    Answer : When you're asked what interests you about the position you are interviewing for, the best way to respond is to describe the qualifications listed in the job posting, then connect them to your skills and experience. That way, the employer will see that you know about the job you're interviewing for (not everyone does) and that you have the qualifications necessary to do the job.

    For example, if you were interviewing for a Human Resources Manager job where you would be responsible for recruiting, orientation, and training, you will want to discuss how you were responsible for these functions in your past positions, and why you are interested in continuing to develop your expertise in Human Resources management.

    In all cases, you will want to convey your enthusiasm for the opportunity to interview, along with your solid ability to do the job.

  2. Why do you want this job?

    Answer : Here some interesting answers.
    • This is not only a fine opportunity, but this company is a place where my qualifications can make a difference. As a finance executive well versed in the new stock options law, I see this position as made to order. It contains the challenge to keep me on my toes. That's the kind of job I like to anticipate every morning.
    • I want this job because it seems tailored to my competencies, which include sales and marketing. As I said earlier, in a previous position I created an annual growth rate of 22 percent in a flat industry. Additionally, the team I would work with looks terrific.
    • I well understand that this is a company on the way up. Your Web site says the launch of several new products is imminent. I want be a part of this business as it grows.
    • Having worked through a college business major building decks and porches for neighbors, this entry-level job for the area's most respected home builder has my name on it.
    • As a dedicated technician, I like doing essential research. Being part of a breakthrough team is an experience I'd love to repeat.
    • This job is a good fit for what I've been interested in throughout my career. It offers a nice mix of short- and long-term activities. My short-term achievements keep me cranked up and the long-term accomplishments make me feel like a billion bucks.

  3. What applicable attributes / experience do you have?

    Answer : When you are asked questions related to the experience that qualifies you for the job, it's important to be very specific about your skills and experience.

    The best way to respond is to describe your responsibilities in detail and to connect them to the job you are interviewing for. Tie your responsibilities in with those listed in the job description for the new position. That way, the employer will see that you have the qualifications necessary to do the job. Focus most on your responsibilities that are directly related to the new job's requirements.

    It's also important to be honest and accurate. Don't embellish your job, because you don't know who the hiring manager will be checking with when they check your references.

  4. Are you overqualified for this job?

    Answer : Overqualified? Some would say that I'm not overqualified but fully qualified. With due respect, could you explain the problem with someone doing the job better than expected?
    • Fortunately, I've lived enough years to have developed the judgment that allows me to focus on the future. Before we speak of past years, past titles and past salaries, can we look at my strengths and abilities and how I've stayed on the cutting edge of my career field, including its technology?
    • I hope you're not concerned that hiring someone with my solid experience and competencies would look like age bias if once on the job you decided you'd made a mistake and I had to go. Can I present a creative idea? Why don't I work on a trial basis for a month -- no strings -- which would give you a chance to view me up close? This immediately solves your staffing problem at no risk to you. I can hit the floor running and require less supervision than a less experienced worker. When can I start?
    • I was proud to be a charge nurse but I really like getting back to working with patients.
    • Salary is not my top priority. Not that I have a trust fund but I will work for less money, will take direction from managers of any age, will continue to stay current on technology and will not leave you in the lurch if Hollywood calls to make me a star. And I don't insist that it's my way or the highway.

  5. What can you do for this company?

    Answer : First of all, be sure to have researched the company prior to the interview, so you are familiar with the company's mission. Respond by giving examples why your education, skills, accomplishments, and experience will make you an asset for the employer.

    Take a few moments to compare your goals with objectives of the company and the position, as well as mentioning what you have accomplished in your other jobs. Be positive and reiterate your interest in the company, as well as the job.

  6. Why should we hire you?

    Answer : A typical interview question, asked to get your opinion, or to validate the interviewer's opinion, on why you would be the best candidate for the position, is "Why should we hire you?"

    The best way to respond is to give concrete examples of why your skills and accomplishments make you the best candidate for the job. Take a few moments to compare the job description with your abilities, as well as mentioning what you have accomplished in your other positions. Be positive and reiterate your interest in the company and the position.

  7. What do you know about this company?

    Answer : A typical job interview question, asked to find out how much company research you have conducted, is "What do you know about this company?"

    Prepare in advance, and in a word, research, so, you can provide relevant and current information about your prospective employer to the interviewer. Start by researching the company online.

    Use the information you have gathered to create a bulleted list of relevant information that you can easily remember during the interview. Taking the time to research will help you make a good impression with how much you know about the company.

  8. Why do you want to work here?

    Answer : A typical interview question, asked to ensure that you are seriously interested in the job and the company, and to find out how much you know about the company, is "Why do you want to work here?"

    best way to answer this question is, first of all, to be prepared and knowledgeable about the company. Spend some time researching the company (the About Us section of the web site is a good place to start) so you can talk about the benefits of working for this employer.

    Compare your goals with objectives of the company and the position, then reiterate why you would be an asset to the employer. Let the interviewer know what you can do for the company, if you get a job offer.

    Even though the question is about why you want to work here, you still need to convince the interviewer that hiring you will benefit the company.

  9. What challenges are you looking for in a position?

    Answer : A typical interview question to determine what you are looking for your in next job, and whether you would be a good fit for the position being hired for, is "What challenges are you looking for in a position?"

    The best way to answer questions about the challenges you are seeking is to discuss how you would like to be able to effectively utilize your skills and experience if you were hired for the job.

    You can also mention that you are motivated by challenges, have the ability to effectively meet challenges, and have the flexibility and skills necessary to handle a challenging job.

    You can continue by describing specific examples of challenges you have met and goals you have achieved in the past.

  10. What can you contribute to this company?

    Answer : A typical interview question to discover how hiring you would benefit the company is "What can you contribute to this company?"

    The best way to answer questions about your contributions to the company is to give examples of what you have accomplished in the past, and to relate them to what you can achieve in the future.

    Describe specific examples of how effective you have been in your other positions, change you have implemented, and goals you have achieved. Talk about the depth and breadth of related experience that you have.

    Also, relate your abilities to the employer's goals. You will want to let the interviewer know that you have the skills necessary to do the job they are hiring for, the ability effectively meet challenges, and the flexibility and diplomacy to work well with other employees and with management.

  11. Are you willing to travel?

    Answer : When you are asked about your willingness to travel during an interview, be honest. There's no point in saying "yes" if you would prefer to be home five nights a week.

    It is perfectly acceptable to ask how much travel is involved. That way, you can weigh how much you would need to be on the road and make an educated decision as to whether the amount of travel required fits in with your lifestyle.

    What's most important is to get a good understanding of what's involved before you are offered the job, rather than being (unpleasantly) surprised after you have already been hired.

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